Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Feng Shui And What The Tiger Holds

It's a question we raise every year. Every Chinese New Year, in fact. And that's what the year has in store for us.

Never mind that some of us are not feng shui practitioners, but never a time had astrologers and feng shui masters had such allure than now when they would be consulted to predict whether we can finally wave goodbye to all the turmoils of last year and say hello to much better times ahead or we will continue to be doomed.

Indeed, if the turnout at local feng shui expert Joey Yap's Succeeding in Turbulent Times seminar in Kuala Lumpur last month were anything to go by, it reflected increasing interest among the locals in the ancient Chinese belief.

According to the Chinese calendar, 2010 is the year of the Metal Tiger. Many feng shui experts predict it to be a year of moderate growth, which makes sense as the world's economy is gradually recovering from the worst economic crisis in decades.

Favourable businesses to be in this year are said to be industries with the fire, earth and metal elements. These include stock market, energy, airline, construction, property, banking/financial and steel sectors.

On an individual basis, people born under the zodiac signs of the Monkey and the Tiger itself clash with the Grand Duke Jupiter star this year, so they must be careful because this year is considered not good for them. Just as important as what to do is what to avoid. They are warned against attending funerals and weddings in the next 12 months.

For those who are born in the year of the Pig, Snake, Rooster and Goat, 2010 is supposed to bring good luck, although there are conflicting views from feng shui experts with regard to those born in the year of the Dog and the Horse.

More often than not feng shui provides sensible advice and there is logic behind most feng shui situations. After all, the basic principle of feng shui is to create certain harmonious aspects between human, building and the environment surrounding it.

For example, a house facing the west is not good from a feng shui perspective. According to property agents, there is logical reasoning for this. For a west-facing house, you are constantly exposed to direct, hot sun in the afternoon that can heat the property to uncomfortable temperatures. To rectify the situation, simply plant shady trees so that you block the sun that beams into your house.

Similarly, every school of feng shui repeatedly warns against living in a house located at a T or Y junction. It's easy to see why. Such junctions are prone to road accidents. Pollution and dust are at their maximum at these junctions. You would also be disturbed by car headlights shining into the living room.

Rather than moving away, you can change the direction of the front door so that it doesn't face that junction anymore.

Still, while most Malaysians may consider feng shui superstitious, thousands of others swear by the results. I have a friend who claimed that the practice of feng shui has changed his business luck for the better and another who used it to counter office politics.

Never mind that some of us are not feng shui practitioners, but never a time had astrologers and feng shui masters had such allure than now when they would be consulted to predict whether we can finally wave goodbye to all the turmoils of last year and say hello to much better times ahead or we will continue to be doomed.

Indeed, if the turnout at local feng shui expert Joey Yap's Succeeding in Turbulent Times seminar in Kuala Lumpur last month were anything to go by, it reflected increasing interest among the locals in the ancient Chinese belief.

According to the Chinese calendar, 2010 is the year of the Metal Tiger. Many feng shui experts predict it to be a year of moderate growth, which makes sense as the world's economy is gradually recovering from the worst economic crisis in decades.

Favourable businesses to be in this year are said to be industries with the fire, earth and metal elements. These include stock market, energy, airline, construction, property, banking/financial and steel sectors.

On an individual basis, people born under the zodiac signs of the Monkey and the Tiger itself clash with the Grand Duke Jupiter star this year, so they must be careful because this year is considered not good for them. Just as important as what to do is what to avoid. They are warned against attending funerals and weddings in the next 12 months.

For those who are born in the year of the Pig, Snake, Rooster and Goat, 2010 is supposed to bring good luck, although there are conflicting views from feng shui experts with regard to those born in the year of the Dog and the Horse.

More often than not feng shui provides sensible advice and there is logic behind most feng shui situations. After all, the basic principle of feng shui is to create certain harmonious aspects between human, building and the environment surrounding it.

For example, a house facing the west is not good from a feng shui perspective. According to property agents, there is logical reasoning for this. For a west-facing house, you are constantly exposed to direct, hot sun in the afternoon that can heat the property to uncomfortable temperatures. To rectify the situation, simply plant shady trees so that you block the sun that beams into your house.

Similarly, every school of feng shui repeatedly warns against living in a house located at a T or Y junction. It's easy to see why. Such junctions are prone to road accidents. Pollution and dust are at their maximum at these junctions. You would also be disturbed by car headlights shining into the living room.

Rather than moving away, you can change the direction of the front door so that it doesn't face that junction anymore.

Still, while most Malaysians may consider feng shui superstitious, thousands of others swear by the results. I have a friend who claimed that the practice of feng shui has changed his business luck for the better and another who used it to counter office politics.

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